INTER-PLAY

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND LANDSCAPE

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3

INSTRUCTOR: VERA PARLAC


2016 FALL

Inter-Play was developed during a theoretical architecture studio that examined significant contemporary developments in architectural discourse. The studio introduced students to the critical themes of formation, communication, and production in order to challenge complex problems that define the discipline of architecture. The project questions how the use of high-end animation and modeling software has transformed our understandings of structure vs. skin and has, in turn, focused more attention on the process of skin or shell structures in architectural formation. Explorations moved between physical and digital space to tease out methods for understanding multi-directional movement in the production of a single surface condition that acts as floors, walls, and ceilings. The studies involved stretching liquid latex and subdividing and bridging NURBS surface in Maya 3D. Through these studies, Inter-Play pushed the boundaries of what we perceive as architectural space, and suggested new ways of thinking about design techniques and modes of representation in architecture.  

At many points during the project’s development, the formal system was physically output using 3D plaster printing since plaster printing doesn’t require support structures during production. Through these procedures, Inter-Play began to reveal the true nature of its exploration into digital morphogenesis – a form generation technique that results in shapes that remain elusive to construction and material logics. Inter-play thus became about showcasing how these techniques have become more ubiquitous in architectural discourse through pushing the project’s representational qualities and post-design optimization.  Inter-Play resulted in raising critical questions about the use of morphogenetic processes in design formation that aren’t purely digital, thus helping to define the start of my research interest in examining relationships between digital design techniques, production technologies, and material system performance.